Immunizations protect people against disease. All children and adults should stay up-to-date with their immunization schedules. This way, they can protect themselves and make sure they don’t pass contagious diseases on to others.

The New York State Department of Health recommends this schedule for children and adolescent immunizations:

Vaccine against:

Birth

2 months

4 months

6 months

12 months

15 months

18-23 months

4-6 years

11-12 years

16 years

Hepatitis B

 

 

1-2 mo.

 

6-18 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rotavirus

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis (DTaP)

 

 

 

 

 

15-18 mo.

 

 

 

 

Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Tdap)2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

 

 

 

1

 

12-15 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

Pneumococcal Disease (PCV)3

 

 

 

 

12-15 mo.

 

Ask your doctor if your child 2 years old or older should get vaccinated with PPSV23. 3

Polio (IPV)

 

 

 

 

6-18 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Influenza

 

 

 

Recommended yearly for all children aged 6 months and older. Ask your doctor if your child should receive one or two doses.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)4

 

 

 

See footnote 4

12-15 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

Varicella (Chickenpox)

 

 

 

 

12-15 mo.

 

 

 

 

 

Hepatitis A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

Meningococcal Disease6

 

Ask your doctor if your child 2 months old or older should get vaccinated against meningococcal disease.

1 For some types of Hib and Rotavirus vaccine, the 6-month dose is not needed.
2 Tdap: Children 7-10 years old who are not fully immunized against pertussis should receive a single dose of Tdap.
3 PCV = Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine; PPSV23 = Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
4 MMR: Children 6-11 months old who are traveling outside the U.S. should receive one dose of MMR before departure.
5 The HPV vaccine includes two shots given six months apart. It is recommended for both boys and girls. Teens who start the series after age 15, and some children with special medical conditions, may need three doses.
6 There are two vaccines that protect against meningococcal disease. Some children with special medical conditions may need both MCV4 and MenB.

For adults, the New York State Department of Health recommends this immunization schedule:

 

19-26 Years

27-59 Years

60-64 Years

65 Years or Older

Influenza (Flu)

You need one dose every year.

Tetanus, Diphtheria, Pertussis (Td, Tdap)

There are two vaccines that are commonly referred to as the “tetanus shot”: Td (tetanus and diphtheria) and Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis). Adults need both vaccines at different times during their lives.

If you are pregnant, you need one dose of Tdap between 27 and 36 weeks of pregnancy, preferably closer to 27 weeks. You will need a repeat dose every time you are pregnant to protect yourself and your baby.

If you’ve never had, or don’t remember having, a tetanus shot before, you will need one Tdap shot followed by two Td shots. You will need a Td shot every 10 years.

Be sure to consult your health care provider if you have a deep or dirty wound. You may need a dose at that time.

Zoster (Shingles)

 

You need one dose of this vaccine if you are 60 or older.

Pneumococcal (PCV13, PPSV23)

 

There are two vaccines that protect against pneumococcal disease: PCV13 and PPSV23. Adults may need both vaccines at different times in their lives.

You need one or more doses of PPSV23 if you smoke cigarettes or have chronic health conditions.*

People with certain medical conditions, including weak immune systems, may also need a dose of PCV13.*

You need both PCV13 and PPSV23 at 65 or older.

 

Varicella (Chickenpox

If you’ve never had chickenpox, or you were never vaccinated, you need to get two doses. If you’ve been vaccinated but you received only one dose, you need to get the second dose as soon as possible.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

 

You need three doses if you are a woman who is 26 or younger, or a man who is 21 or younger and did not already complete the series. You might only need two doses if you started as a teenager. Some men aged 22-26 should also get the HPV vaccine.*

 

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

You may need one or two doses if you were born in 1957 or later and you were never vaccinated.*

You may need one or two doses if you were born before 1957 and you work in the health care field.*

Meningococcal

 

There are two vaccines that protect against meningococcal disease: MCV4 (meningococcal conjugate) and MenB (serogroup B meningococcal). You need one or more doses of MCV4 vaccine if you:

·         Are a first-year college student who is 21 or younger living in communal housing,

·         Are a military recruit,

·         Live or work in certain other high-risk settings, or

·         Have certain medical conditions.*

Ask your health care provider about MenB vaccine if you do not have a spleen (or it does not work well), have sickle cell disease, have complement component deficiency, or are 23 or younger.*

Hepatitis A

 

You need two doses if you have never been fully vaccinated and you are either at risk for hepatitis A* or wish to be protected.

Hepatitis B

 

You need three doses if you have never been fully vaccinated and you are either at risk for hepatitis B* or wish to be protected.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)

You need one or more doses of this vaccine if you do not have a spleen (or it doesn’t work well), have sickle cell disease, or received a bone marrow transplant.*

Do you travel outside the United States?

 

If yes, you may need some of the above, and additional, vaccines. Please consult with your health care provider or a travel health specialist.

For more information about vaccine recommendations for your travel destination, you can call the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at 1-800-232-4636, or visit their website at www.cdc.gov/travel.

*Consult your health care provider to determine your risk for infection and your need for this vaccine.

For more immunization information, including helpful videos, click here .

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